Wednesday, January 5, 2011

Definition of network management

Network management means different things to different people. In some cases, it involves a solitary network consultant monitoring network activity with an outdated protocol analyzer. In other cases, network management involves a distributed database, auto polling of network devices, and high-end workstations generating real-time graphical views of network topology changes and traffic. In general, network management is a service that employs a variety of tools, applications, and devices to assist human network managers in monitoring and maintaining networks.

Before or after implementing any Network It’s a duty for the Network Manager to handle it.The network manager is the person who takes decision regarding the network. This simple structure describes how the Network Manager’s authority dissolves among the subordinates It’s the duty of the Subordinate’s to report about various factors to the network manager. Also it’s the duty of the Network Manager to Report several things to the top management or to the chairmen. As a head of a Network, the Network Manager has many tasks to do when performing his profession.

Following are some Duties or Responsibilities of a Network Manager.

Coordinating Administrators Work

  • All the Network, Database & System Administrators are subordinates of the Network Manager. Due to that the Network Manager will have to coordinate with them. The
  • network manager will have to get various documents/reports from the administrators as they monitor some areas of the whole network.
  • Reporting to the Top Management Regarding the Network
  • The Network has to Report about various aspects of the network. He will need to get periodical reports on various factors which keep the network on line for utilization.

The Main Duties of the Network Manager can be divided into five sub units.
• Fault Management
• Configuration Management
• Account Management
• Performance Management
• Security Management
• Other Management Areas
o Hardware Management
o Software Management

Route process

Routing involves the following two key elements.

  • The host must know which router to use for a given destination; the router is determined by the default gateway. The default gateway is the IP address of the router on your local network; this router will route the packet to the destination network.

  • The router must know where to send the packet; the destination is determined by the router's routing information table.

CRASH FREE NETWORK

We can make crash free network to solve the problems which I given below.
• Using data traffic management and high speed equipments for does the network well. Normally switches are providing data management facility to the network. And using Ethernet stranded we can performed high speed for the network it might be can protect data packets.


• Using high speed cable type and using multiple caballing. We can use twisted pair cable for solving this problem and using high speed Ethernet cables e.g.: CAT 5e, CAT 6 etc. And use multiple lines for the caballing. The major thing is we want use high band width cables; most successful method is using Fiber Optic Cable for doing network but its given extra cost for the networking.


• Using high speed NIC for the networking. Adapter card should be high speed adapter card
because transferring data speed should be protected and the capacity of the NIC should be incise.

• Reduce the range between the computes and using repeaters and routes for amplify the data.

Data packets are not energy full for travel very long distances among the computers. So before made the network we want to reduce the range or else using the amplifier equipments for between computers. Those equipments are routers and repeaters.

• Using different wise network topologies. Net work topology is the other reason for the network crashing. So we can produce different network topologies for same network environment to solve the network crashing.

Direct route

If two computers on the same physical network need to communicate, the packets do not require a router. The computers are considered to be on the same local network. In an IEEE 802.3/ethernet TCP/IP network, the sending entity encapsulates the packet in an ethernet frame, binds the destination Internet address to an ethernet address, and transmits the resulting frame directly to its destination. This process is referred to as direct routing. The Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) is an example of a direct routing protocol.
The destination system is on the same physical network if the network portions of the source and destination addresses are the same.



Indirect routing
If two computers that are not on the same physical network need to communicate, they must send the IP packet to a router for delivery. They are located on remote networks. Whenever a router is involved in communication, the activity is considered indirect routing.

Direct routing

If two computers on the same physical network need to communicate, the packets do not require a router. The computers are considered to be on the same local network. In an IEEE 802.3/ethernet TCP/IP network, the sending entity encapsulates the packet in an ethernet frame, binds the destination Internet address to an ethernet address, and transmits the resulting frame directly to its destination. This process is referred to as direct routing. The Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) is an example of a direct routing protocol.
The destination system is on the same physical network if the network portions of the source and destination addresses are the same.

Interactivity on the Web

Five years ago, the Web was very static. You could see text and graphics and you could click on links. Then other types of media started to appear; sound, animation, video and interactive applications. The interactivity was brought about by four different techniques. The first is the Plug-in technique. A plug-in is not a part of a browser. It is a separate program that is invoked by the browser when it encounters a file with a format that the plugin module can understand. There are hundreds of plug-ins on the Internet that you can download and install on your computer. Some of them cost money, but most of them are free.


The difficulty with plug-ins is that you have to find them, download them and install them. First you must find the right plug-in on the Internet. There are different plug-ins for different platforms, so you have to make sure that the plug-in that you want to download is the right one. Then you have to download the plug-in; a process that typically takes 10 to 20 minutes through a 28.8 kbps modem. The file you’ve downloaded is almost always archived and compressed, so you have to decompress and de-archive it. Then you have to install the plugin before you’re ready to use it.


There is another variant of the plug-in technique called a helper application. A helper application is exactly the same thing as a plug-in, that is a small program that is invoked by the browser. The only difference is that a plug-in shows its information within the window of the browser, while a helper applications shows its information in an external window.

The second technique is called CGI, which stands for Common Gateway Interface. One use is for entering data in a form on a web page and submitting it by clicking on a button. Another use is to sense where the user clicks on an active image area. There are many other ways to use CGI.


The third technique, called the Scripting Languages, involves extending the HTML code by using a programming language called a script language. The code of the scripting language is mixed with the HTML code. When you open an HTML page with a word processor you can actually see the code of the scripting language. The browser interprets the scripting language code in a similar way it interprets the HTML code. The most common scripting language is JavaScript.

The fourth technique is Java. This technique involves sending, not just the data from the server to the client, but also the program that will handle this data. In this way users don’t have to find, download and install plug-ins on their computers.

IBM LAN Server


The LAN Server was in the beginning, a product developed by IBM and Microsoft. After a time Microsoft left this project but IBM developed it further and called it IBM LAN Server. IBM chose to run OS/2 on a dedicated server. IBM LAN Server supports DOS and Windows based clients. The supported transport protocols are NetBEUI and TCP/IP. This gives the LAN Server the opportunity to be used in mixed environments. The IBM LAN Server is not as common as NetWare or NT.

Tag

Assignment Lanka Tag Cloud
Computer Networks The History of Local Area Networks, LAN, The Topologies of a Networks, LANs describe different types of transmission Medias, Local Area Networks Access Methods, Carrier Sense Multiple Access with Collision Detect, Development of LAN Technologies. LAN -Token Ring, LAN Ethernet Digital, LAN - Ethernet Sun microsystems, LAN - Ethernet Mixed Environment, LAN - Token Ring was introduced by IBM LAN - IBM implementation of Token Ring, Token Ring Novell, LAN Token Ring - in a mixed environment, LAN - Fiber Distributed Data Interface, LAN - ATM, LAN Components, LAN Switching Methods, Virtual Local Area Network, Port based VLAN, Mac based VLAN, Protocol based VLAN, User Base VLAN, PC networks Components, PC networks Shared resources, PC Network operating systems, PC networks Novell Netware, PC networks Windows NT, PC networks IBM LAN Server Computer Programming Languages HTML Language, The Generations of Programming Languages, Different types of High Level Languages, Different types of High Level Languages Disadvantages
Computer Networks - IBM LAN Server, Windows NT Networks, Novell Netware, Network operating systems, Networks Shared, Networks Components, User Base, Protocol based, Mac based, Port based, VLAN, LAN Switching, LAN Components, ATM, Fiber Data, Token Ring, Token Ring Novell, IBM implementation, Ethernet, Sun microsystems, Ethernet Digital, Token passing, LAN Technologies, CSMA/CD, Access Methods, Transmission, Networks, The History of Local Area Networks, LAN